Share:

Years and Volumes

Success! Thank you for subscribing to receive email notifications when new articles are published in Molecular Medicine 2015. Click here to manage your subscriptions.

 
Molecular Medicine Volume 12

Articles from this Volume

Fabio Malavasi, Silvia Deaglio, Enza Ferrero, Ada Funaro, Jaime Sancho, Clara M Ausiello, Erika Ortolan, Tiziana Vaisitti, Mercedes Zubiaur, Giorgio Fedele, Semra Aydin, Elena V Tibaldi, Ilaria Durelli, Riccardo Lusso, Franco Corzo, and Alberto L Horenstein

View article PDF
Posted by Leah Caracappa on Dec 14, 2011 2:48 PM CST
Fortunato Morabito, Rajendra N Damle, Silvia Deaglio, Michael Keating, Manlio Ferrarini, and Nicholas Chiorazzi

View article PDF
Posted by Leah Caracappa on Dec 14, 2011 2:47 PM CST
George T Stevenson

View article PDF

 

Posted by Leah Caracappa on Dec 7, 2006 12:00 AM CST
2006 Supplement 
 
The function of the mammalian immune system is to detect and destroy foreign antigens from viruses, bacteria and other exogenous sources; as well as dysfunctional or aberrant endogenous antigens, such as cancer cells.  In this capacity, cells of the immune system can have highly lethal effects on its targets, a characteristic that allows rapid and efficient clearance of undesired cells, microorganisms, and antigens.  Left uncontrolled, however, these lethal activities can have adverse effects on normal cells and tissues, causing pathologies ranging from rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and septic shock, to lupus, myeloma and leukemia.  In order to maintain the proper balance between healthful and harmful immune responses, the cells of the immune system rely on complex direct and indirect interactions that are mediated in part through cell surface molecules including some known as cellular differentiation (CD) markers. Over 500 leukocyte CD markers have been characterized to date.  These surface proteins serve as the interface between the immune cells and their environment, and occupy a central role in transducing intracellular signals that regulate cellular activities.  Among these cell surface proteins are two members of a family of cyclases that metabolize nicotinic adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) into nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) and cyclic adenosine dinucleotide phosphate-ribose (cADPR), and are potent modulators of the immune system.  These two ectoenzymes, known as CD38 and CD157, have been the focus of much research into the biology of the immune system.  Research being conducted by molecular biologists, protein chemists, immunologists and clinicians has generated a better understanding of the biological functions of the CD38 family of ectoenzymes, and their roles in health and disease.  Discoveries in basic biology, combined with clinical observations and ground-breaking translational research, are setting the stage for targeted therapeutics, and fulfilling the mission of molecular medicine. As presented at the Torino CD38 Meeting, the culmination of these efforts is the identification of these ectoenzymes as potential new therapeutic targets or diagnostic markers for myleoma and leukemia.

View Full Supplement PDF
Posted by Leah Caracappa on Dec 6, 2006 12:00 AM CST
Fabio Malavasi, Silvia Deaglio, Enza Ferrero, Ada Funaro, Jaime Sancho, Clara M Ausiello, Erika Ortolan, Tiziana Vaisitti, Mercedes Zubiaur, Giorgio Fedele, Semra Aydin, Elena V Tibaldi, Ilaria Durelli, Riccardo Lusso, Franco Corzo, and Alberto L Horenstein

View article PDF
Posted by Leah Caracappa on Dec 5, 2006 12:00 AM CST
Posted by Leah Caracappa on Dec 4, 2006 12:00 AM CST
Richard A Billington, Santina Bruzzone, Antonio De Flora, Armando A Genazzani, Friedrich Koch-Nolte, Mathias Ziegler, and Elena Zocchi

View article PDF
Posted by Leah Caracappa on Dec 3, 2006 12:00 AM CST
Posted by Leah Caracappa on Dec 2, 2006 12:00 AM CST
Posted by Leah Caracappa on Dec 1, 2006 12:00 AM CST
Amy Warenda Czura and Christopher J Czura

View article 
PDF
Posted by Leah Caracappa on Nov 7, 2006 12:00 AM CST
< Prev    1 2